Posts Tagged police

London riots 2011: Where were police? Shopkeepers mystified as they’re left defenceless | Mail Online

Angie Bray, MP for Ealing Central and Acton, said policing could be ‘more robust’ but added that it was difficult because officers were ‘damned if they do, damned if they don’t’.

Nonsense. They’re damned if they use violence unnecessarily or use a greater force than required, such as in the case of Mr. Tomlinson or Mr. Menenzes.

She said: ‘Policing is done by consent and we have to decide what level of policing we are prepared to go to. In my personal opinion they could be a lot more robust.’

Policing is done by consent? What nonsense!  It’s done by consent when that works, but when it doesn’t, other methods need to be employed.

It was also unclear if frontline officers were hamstrung as the disorder spread by fears that their actions could further inflame tensions.

Last night, several flashpoints in the capital were left completely lawless as Scotland Yard ran out of teams to send out to new troublespots.

Residents questioned why no police officers were available to combat rampant looting as thieves methodically cleared stores.

Groups of shopkeepers and young men were forced to take to the streets to fight off rioters to protect businesses in some areas.

Up to 300 officers were drafted in from the Home Counties to bolster the response but they were overwhelmed by the sheer scale of the fighting.

The relative calm in Dalston was laid at the door of ‘heroic mobs’ of Turkish men standing guard in the high street, one resident said.

In the busy shopping street of Green Street, in Forest Hill, there were reports that 400 young Asian men had chased off up to 150 rioters.

via London riots 2011: Where were police? Shopkeepers mystified as they’re left defenceless | Mail Online.

It seems clear that what works is determined people, even unarmed ones, acting in concert.


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Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive a commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. This disclosure is in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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Japan man arrested collecting schoolgirl saliva | My Sinchew

A 55-year-old jobless Japanese man has been arrested in Tokyo for having three schoolgirls spit out saliva and filming them in the process, police said Tuesday.

Toshihiko Mizuno was caught in Tokyo on Monday on suspicion of “habitual indecency,” which carries a penalty of up to one year in jail or a fine of one million yen ($12,400), the Metropolitan Police Department said.

via Japan man arrested collecting schoolgirl saliva | My Sinchew.

Why “jobless” is mentioned? What does it have to do with the charge or the punishment? Would his behaviour be considered more leniently if he were employed? What if he had a part-time job? Would he get half-leniency? Is his behaviour all the worse because he has no job? Or could the fact that he has no job be a reason for his behaviour, e.g. he planned to sell the video footage (people will buy anything, believe me!)?

Secondly, what is “habitual indecency” and who decides? It is not a crime to video young girls spitting into containers, so somebody somewhere has to come up with a category of misdemeanor with which to charge this person. Who?

And what other “crimes” could be covered by this vague phrase “habitual indecency”? Who decides what is indecent? The law does not say, so presumably it’s… the judge? But before that, someone must make an arrest! The police, then? But it’s unlikely an alert copper spotted this behaviour. More likely a nosy neighbour or concerned parent alerted the police, who then swooped in, but only AFTER coming up with a plausible reason to arrest this guy.

And why were the girls not arrested, too? Surely the spitting (and in public, too!) is what is indecent. Or is someone trying to say that using a video camera for the purpose for which it is made – to video things –  is “indecent”, even “habitual”?

A smart lawyer could have a field day with this!

 


I recommend the following digital products: WP GDPR Fix, a WordPress plugin that quickly and easily helps you make your WP blog GDPR compliant. Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive a commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. This disclosure is in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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