Posts Tagged iodine

Too little, too late? Radiation survey meets skepticism / Fukushima Pref. residents asked to recall diet, activities from 4 months ago : National : DAILY YOMIURI ONLINE The Daily Yomiuri

FUKUSHIMA–Worries about health problems stemming from radiation leaked from the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant have not eased among residents in Fukushima Prefecture.Although the Fukushima prefectural government has decided to carry out health checks on all of the about 2 million residents in the prefecture, some experts have questioned whether exact radiation exposure can be tested four months after the crisis broke out.

The prefectural government also plans to closely examine internal radiation levels taken in through food, targeting about 200,000 people from evacuation areas. However, it is likely that very little radioactive material will be detected, according to experts.

In addition to the fact that ingested radioactive material is carried out of the body in urine, radioactive iodine has a half-life of just eight days.

Makoto Akashi, executive director of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, said: “I don’t think radioactive iodine will be detected. It’s likely that [prefectural] residents were not exposed to high levels of radiation, but I don’t think it’s possible to make a precise estimate of their radiation exposure.”

via Radiation survey meets skepticism / Fukushima Pref. residents asked to recall diet, activities from 4 months ago : National : DAILY YOMIURI ONLINE The Daily Yomiuri.

So is this too little, too late? Or is it just whitewash, to show that the government “is doing something”? Or is it genuinely a good idea? And who will pay for all this?

“What? Do I have to write in this much detail?” asked Makiko Kowata, 37. Kowata has been taking shelter in the city of Fukushima after evacuating from Namiemachi, located within the no-entry zone around the crippled nuclear power plant…. Kowata has to write what she did for the two weeks after the disaster minute-by-minute. She also has to write the amount of vegetables, fruits and milk she consumed through the end of March.

“I don’t remember what I did four months ago. If the government planned to conduct this research, it should’ve told us earlier. Then I would have recorded [what I ate and where I went],” she complained.

Although she said the health check is necessary for children, “I wonder if precise radiation exposure can be estimated through this kind of questionnaire.”

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Updated advice on Japan from Government Chief Scientific Adviser to UK Ambassador

Sir John Beddington, Government Chief Scientific Adviser, spoke to Her Majesty’s Ambassador to Japan David Warren on 25 March with an update on the situation in Japan. Transcript of phone call (16.00 hours local time) 25 March.

[JB] Let me take water first and I will ask Hilary Walker [Health Protection Agency] and JM to comment. First of all, we think that the advice being given by the Japanese authorities is extremely sensible: We would recommend that advice is followed. The other thing I would comment on is that radiation levels that the Japanese use in developing their recommendations are more cautious that the ones we have in the UK or Europe more generally. In terms of the mains water supply as was reported on 23rd March, it is pretty much safe to drink for all age groups for a short period. In terms of consumption of water, babies should avoid it. I think I’ll pass to Hilary for her comments on that.

[Hilary Walker: HW] As John was saying, the Japanese recommendations are much more cautious than ours. You must remember that these levels are based on assumptions of consumption over quite a long period of time.

[JB] Yes, this is just a one-off occasion. An explanation for it will be sought, but at the moment the recommendations from the Japanese seem completely sensible. Just to add to that it is completely safe for washing. You don’t have to go and buy bottled water to bathe your children in.

The other thing I’d like to say in terms of water is around the stable iodine tablets. Read the rest of this entry »

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Preventative measures in case of radiation exposure

As the situation in Fukushima remains critical and may still get worse, I’m re-posting some links to sources of information about iodine, potassium iodide, the Japanese diet, and various supplements. I have not tried any of these and amd not recommending them.  Please do your own research. Kelp is konbu 昆布 コンブ in Japanese.

Some people have expressed concerns over the lack of Potassium Iodide available at stores in Japan. Potassium Iodide is used to protect the thyroid gland from the effects of radiation exposure.

First off, in Japan, most druggist do not carry Potassium Iodide as one needs a prescription to buy it. Secondly, the average Japanese gets more than sufficient amounts of iodine in their regular foods that it is not necessary at all to supplement it.

via Marketing Japan: Potassium Iodide Not Necessary for People Who Eat Japanese Diet. Read the rest of this entry »

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Iodine for Radioactive Fallout by Donald W. Miller, Jr., MD

Iodine for Radioactive Fallout by Donald W. Miller, Jr., MD.

This is an excellent article to read if you are concerned about radioactive iodine. This is yet another excellent piece of information that was not written by a journalist and not propagate by mainstream media.

These grafs caught my attention:

Fallout from a nuclear bomb explosion or a nuclear power plant meltdown is full of radioactive iodine-131 (I-131). Nuclear fission splits the nuclei of uranium-235 and plutonium-239, producing I-131. The stable, natural isotope of iodine is iodine-127…

Radioactive I-131 emits Beta electrons and gamma rays, which destroy cells and cause cancer. People living downwind from a nuclear bomb explosion or power plant meltdown can inhale or ingest radioactive fallout, or have it come in contact with skin. The I-131 in fallout “dust” can damage the thyroid gland and cause it to become cancerous. Other tissues and glands in the body that concentrate iodine are also at risk, notably women’s breasts. The most common sequel from exposure to radioactive fallout is thyroid cancer.

Taken in a sufficient amount, natural iodine can block uptake of radioactive I-131 in fallout and prevent thyroid cancer…

 

In order to be effective in blocking I-131 uptake, the 100 mg dose of iodine needs to be taken in a window of 24 hours before and 2 hours after exposure to fallout (Health Physics 2000;78:660–667).

Consuming an average of 240 micrograms (mcg) of iodine a day, most Americans have an insufficient amount of iodine stored in their bodies…



Fortunately, this is the case with the Japanese. People in Japan eat a lot of seaweed, which protects them against the deleterious effects of I-131 in radioactive fallout from the meltdown of their Fukushima Dalichi nuclear plants. Compared to terrestrial plants, which contain only trace amounts of iodine (0.001 mg/gm), the seaweed that the Japanese consume – brown algai (kelp), red algae (nori sheets, with sushi), and green algae (chlorella) – have a high concentration of this nutrient (0.5–8.0 mg/gm). According to public health officials there, people in Japan consume 14.5 gm of seaweed a day. They don’t need to take potassium iodide tablets for fallout. They consume enough iodine in the seaweed they eat…



Chernobyl (April 26, 1986), until now, has been the only accident in the history of commercial nuclear power where radiation-related fatalities have occurred. The steam explosion and fire in this reactor, uncontained and lacking an emergency core-cooling system, released 5 percent of the reactor’s radioactive core into the atmosphere. Some 134 employees developed acute radiation sickness and 28 died from it. No increase in cancer incidence or mortality has been observed attributable to the ionizing radiation it released. Thyroid cancer is another matter. The explosion spread significant amounts of I-131, raising the incidence of thyroid cancer in children in the Ukraine from 0.7 per million to 4 per million. Dr. Arthur Robinson reckons that only 70 extra cases of thyroid cancer have arisen in children living near Chernobyl as a result of the accident, and these cancers could have been prevented had the Ukrainian authorities provided these children with iodine.

At Three Mile Island (March 28, 1979), a partial core meltdown was largely contained within the reactor building. No deaths resulted from the accident, and the amount of radiation released into the environment was the equivalent of a single chest X-ray for people living within ten miles of the reactor.

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Marketing Japan: Potassium Iodide Not Necessary for People Who Eat Japanese Diet

The ever-alert MikeInTokyoRogers reports:

Some people have expressed concerns over the lack of Potassium Iodide available at stores in Japan. Potassium Iodide is used to protect the thyroid gland from the effects of radiation exposure.First off, in Japan, most druggist do not carry Potassium Iodide as one needs a prescription to buy it. Secondly, the average Japanese gets more than sufficient amounts of iodine in their regular foods that it is not necessary at all to supplement it.Dr. Donald Miller reports about Potassium Iodide and the Japanese diet on Lew Rockwell:

via Marketing Japan: Potassium Iodide Not Necessary for People Who Eat Japanese Diet.

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