What do you think of this video as a teaching or a marketing tool?

[yframe url=’http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NtRmS7q9DlM’]

I’m looking into creating my own instructional videos. If I could make something like the one above, I’d be happy. Here’s why.

  1. background music. It’s upbeat but doesn’t drown out or distract from the speaker.
  2. good use of lighting and background. The man’s face and out well on the background (dark suit, dark tie, suitable professorial background of books on shelves, relevant titles stacked on the table in front of him with the title is visible to the viewer)
  3. Zooming in. Video starts off from a fairly wide angle then cuts to a close-up after about 20 seconds. The camera doesn’t waste time zooming in. The straight cut from wide angle to close-up gives a sense of action and vitality. The camera cuts back again about a minute later, but the video avoids fussy and frequent angle changes that would distract from the speaker and the content.
  4. Quickly gets to the point. The main point is three myths about immigration, and they are mentioned within the first 30 seconds. They are also listed on screen for emphasis and easy comprehension.
  5. Brief. The whole video is less than 3 min long. Each of the three main points is explained in 10 to 15 seconds, with a callout on-screen for easy comprehension.
  6. The speaker talks straight into the camera. (Compare with this video by Art Carden, where the speaker for most of the time is facing at a slight angle of the camera. Which do you prefer?)
  7. Good sound. The speaker’s voice is crystal clear. Can you see the mike? (It’s a lapel mike clipped to his tie and plugged directly into the camera. Using the camera’s built-in mike often results in echoey, poor quality sound.)
  8. The video begins not with a topic sentence that introduces the subject, but with one short sentence taken from somewhere in the body of the talk. Then the music starts and we see the title screen. Neat and professional and attractive.
  9. Good use of simple computer graphics. After 50 seconds, we see two simple figures on screen above the speakers hands to represent the immigrant worker and the American worker. This is simple but effective; it adds to the viewer’s comprehension, without distracting. At the one-minute mark (and again at 2 minutes), we see an animated graph that moves in sync with the speaker’s words. Simple and effective (though perhaps not so simple to accomplish).
  10. Natural speech. The speaker speaks at normal conversational speed. You feel he is talking directly at you as if you were sitting right opposite him in the same room. You don’t get the feeling of being lectured to by a distant lecturer at a podium. The speakers face is lively without being distracting, and the same is true for the hand gestures.
  11. In the final 10 seconds, two social networking links appear on-screen, while a third link invites viewers to subscribe to that video channel.
  12. The final screen shows a link where the viewer can go to learn more.

Youtube provides links to related videos, some of which were made by the same people and with the same speaker.

What do you think of this video?


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