It is to try and prevent things like this happening, that the Japanese government yesterday asked foreign media to report objectively on the crisis at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant, the Foreign Ministry said Thursday, as sensationalist or factually incorrect reports are believed to have fanned fears and led to import restrictions on Japanese products.

Notice that the Daily Mail article does not provide any figures. By ommission, it suggests that the parents’ fears were justified.

Scores of schools in South Korea were closed today as teachers and parents panicked over fears that falling rain could be carrying radiation from Japans crippled nuclear plant.As rain swept across the Korean capital, Seoul, and the surrounding Gyeonggi province, classes were cancelled or cut back and children were hurried to their homes.Seoul is around 750 miles from the damaged nuclear plant at Fukushima and since the March 11 earthquake and tsunami radiation has been

via Japan nuclear crisis: South Korea schools closed over Fukushima radiation fears | Mail Online.

教室出租 02 by Sharelady on Flickr

教室出租 02 by Sharelady on Flickr


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