Tag Archives: week 7

AW2: week 7, November 24th, 2017

Homework

  • Complete your final draft  (final version) of your Essay #4 and email it to me, if you have not already done so, or if you did not give it to me in class on Friday.
  • Email me by Monday 23:59  your preference regarding the class copy of Essay #4 (only if you have not already done so).
    • Do you give your permission for your essay to be copied for the class collection?
      • If yes, are you OK with your name being published or not?
    • Do you want a copy of the class collection of Essay #4?

Today’s class

  1. Principles and values:
    1. When persuading, we tend to argue from our own values
    2. But if the other party does not share those values, our efforts will fail.
    3. Therefore, it is useful and important to know and understand other people’s values in order to more successfully persuade them.
  2. Grammar worksheets:
    1. Topic sentences / thesis statements (practice)
    2. Sentence fragments
    3. Reduce wordiness
    4. Parallel structures
    5. Dangling modifiers
  3. 1-to-1 conferencing

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AW1, Week 7, June 2nd, 2017

Homework

  1. Look over today’s handouts,
  2. watch the two videos below,
    1. Claims, Reasons and Evidence
    2. Claim Evidence Reasoning…in 5 minutes or less
  3. check your email. In the next few days, I will send each of you two files containing my corrections and suggestions for your Essay #1.
    1. read either file, then
  4. Re-write your essay – final draft.
  5. Email it to me.
    1. File name: AW1_Essay1_Final_(Name)
    2. Email subject: AW1 Essay1 Final (Name)
  6. Print out and bring it to next week’s class.
  7. Look at the Slip or Trip? picture.
    1. What does Queenie claim happened?
    2. What can you see and what did the autopsy say (evidence)?
    3. What is your theory, your (counter-)claim, about what happened?
    4. Why (reasoning)?

Today’s class

  1. Marking Key handout: MARKING KEY for ACADEMIC WRITING
  2. Common errors (handout next week)
  3. Buffalo handout: BUFFALO
  4. CER_worksheet_AW1
  5. Newton cloze:
  6. Slip or trip? – handout: Slip or Trip

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AW2 WEEK 7, NOVEMBER 18TH, 2016

Homework

  1. Write an outline and introductory paragraph for a response essay to this article:trump-foreign-policy-speech
  2. What are the “five main weaknesses” in US foreign policy, according to the article? Use direct quotations or paraphrasing.
  3. Cite the original speech (see the sample essay in the textbook p. 114).

Today’s  class

  1. “Entangling alliances” quote from Thomas Jefferson’s inaugural speech, March 1, 1801. (See last week’s handout “Excerpts from George Washington’s Farewell Address”. Download it here: washington-farewell-address
  2. Choose one quote from the list (the one you summarised last week) and write an introductory paragraph about it. (Download the list of quotes here: analyzing_political_comments
    1. Include a summary of the original quote,
    2. a reference to the source (where it came from), and
    3. your thesis statement (your position on the matter).
  3. Short discussion of the homework article “The America First Committee”. (Donwload it here: america-first-committee
  4. Textbook sample essay: how does the writer show which ideas are her own and which ideas are from the original writer (Penenberg)?
  5. Choose one of the two essays in the Appendix of the textbook, and write an introductory paragraph for a response essay about it.
    1. Give the reference.
    2. Summarize the main ideas
    3. Give your thesis statement.
    4. Add the reference (see “Work Cited” in the sample essay on p. 114).

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Academic Writing I, week 7: June 3rd, 2016

Homework

  • Read the Format checklist (download it here: Academic Writing checklist
  • If necessary, re-format your essay,  make any other changes you wish, print it out and bring it to class next week.
  • If you have not done so already, please email me your final essay as soon as possible.
    • Please use the following format for your file name: AW1_Essay1_Final_<Family Name>
    • Please send as a Word document (not pdf).

Today’s class

  1. Explanation of the Academic Writing format checklist  (download it here: Academic Writing checklist  )
  2. Look at the sample academic format paper (download it here: Sample essay format  ), then look at the example of a wrongly formatted paper
    1. There are 15 mistakes. How many can you find?
  3. How to investigate a topic
    1. Review of the approach (see last week’s class blog, step 4).
  4. Fact or Opinion? (Download the worksheet here: Fact and Opinion

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Academic Writing II, week 7: November 13th, 2015

Homework:

  • Write an outline and a first draft response to one of the two essays in the Appendix to the textbook pp. 162-165. Either
    • “Don’t Shoot!” or
    • “Homework Stinks”
  • This is a first draft, so it does not need to be typed. Bring it to class next Friday (Nov. 20th).

Today’s class:

  1. Exchange homeworks and comment on your classmate’s work.
  2. The benefits of learning Academic Writing
    1. The origins of “Academic Writing” lie in the trivium:
      1. grammar
      2. logic
      3. rhetoric
    2. studying these can help to protect yourself against being persuaded by false arguments, also known as logical fallacies (link to Japanese language site that explains logical fallacies)
      1. appeal to authority
      2. appeal to fear
      3. appeal to pity
      4. ad hominem
  3. Textbook: p. 115 practice 2 (write answers on looseleaf and hand in)

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Academic Writing I, week 7: May 30th, 2015

Homework:

  1. Email me your Essay#1 AND your re-written essay as soon as possible and by Friday June 5th at the latest.
    1. You can send your essay first, and send your re-write later, or both together. It’s up to you.
    2. Please save your essay as AW1_Essay1_YourName  (family name only is ok).
    3. Please save your re-write as AW1_Essay1_Rewrite_YourName

Makeup class for May 1st will be July 11. Time and place will be announced later.

Today’s class:

  1. Academic writing is characterized by
    1. analysis (breaking ideas down into separate pieces). Academic writing is concerned with ideas rather than stories of events.
    2. deductive reasoning (see some examples here)
    3. semi-formal voice, e.g. “do not” instead of “don’t”, “they are” instead of “they’re”, “is not” instead of “isn’t”, etc. Avoid conversational expressions, e.g. “I had a tough time”, or “it was very nice” or “they are cool”; replace with more formal expressions such as “I had a number of difficulties” or “It was pleasant weather/delicious food/enjoyable experience,” or “they are elegant/attractive/charming/good-looking/well dressed”, etc.
    4. 3rd-person point of view, rather than first-person. E.g. “Perfume is a highly popular Japanese girls’ pop group” instead of “I like Pokemon”.
  2. One-page writing workshop (handouts). There were three today (you can download them here: One-page Writing Workshop )
    1. Academic writing began in Europe as letters written between scientists exchanging scientific information.
      1. These letters were not for personal or social purposes, therefore personal or social conversation was not included.
      2. Academic writing takes place between educated people who may or may not live in the same area or country, who may or may not speak each other’s language but share a common language (in this case, English; originally, it was Latin).
      3. The purpose of academic writing is to contribute to the community’s pool of factual, true knowledge about the world and how it works.
      4. Academic readers, therefore, are interested in your factual information which will increase their knowledge and understanding about how the world works. They are not interested in you personally.
      5. Therefore, avoid expressions such as “Why I became interested in ….” or “I love….” or “I have studied …. for xxx years”.
    2. Avoid using “we” (which usually means “we Japanese”). You are not a representative of the entire Japanese people, nor have you any evidence (usually) to back up your claim. Instead, use phrases like “Many people in Japan” or “It is customary/traditional in Japan to…” This also follows the rule of using the 3rd-person point of view and avoiding the first person (“we” is first person plural).
    3. Focus on general ideas rather than unique, personal details. For example, in the sample essay in the textbook on pp. 15-6, the writer never mentions the names of her best friends, or her teachers, or even the name of the school. Why not? Because she is focusing on general ideas or principles, such as “growing through adversity”, or “learning to appreciate one’s parents”. Writing the names of her school, for instance, would suggest that hers was a unique experience rather than one that can be shared by other human beings.

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Academic Writing II, week 7: November 14th, 2014

Homework

Choose something that you disagree with – an idea in a story, novel or movie; a politician’s speech, a policy change in your town or university – and write about it, explaining why you disagree with it.

Today’s class

  1. Read ten thesis statements from students’ essays and decided if they were ok or not, and why.
  2. Re-write last week’s free-writing (about something you like) to be more academic.
  3. Freewriting: write about something you don’t like.
  4. Share with a classmate and comment.
  5. Re-write it as academic writing.

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Academic Writing I, week 7: May 30th, 2014

Homework:

Read the outline on p. 52, then write a similar outline for your essay #2, the problem-solution essay.

Today’s class:

  1. Academic writing principles:
    1. The reader is not interested in you.
    2. The writer and reader trade (exchange) value: the writer gives value to the reader, and hopes to receive value back from the reader in the future.
      1. Value = new ideas, new and useful information, a different (fresh) point of view, something funny, something sad, something shocking (=some new experience).
    3. The reader is someone outside your culture and group.
  2. Essay titles: what’s wrong? Listen to these actual essay titles and decide if they violate the three principles above or not.
    1. My English life
    2. Why I study American and European language and culture
    3. Is a bicycle just a tool?
    4. My school trip to Singapore
    5. A mother always influences her daughter
    6. A gift my teacher gave me
    7. The blind man’s gift:
  3. Textbook exercises
    1. p. 46  Practice 3
    2. p. 48 A Read the two different ways to organize a problem-solution essay
    3. p. 49: read the two outlines
    4. p. 50 Practice 5. Read the paragraph and answer the questions

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Academic Writing II – week 7, November 15th, 2013

Homework:

Read the sample essay in the textbook on pages 113-4.

Today’s class:

  1. Free writing #1: any topic, 5 minutes.
  2. Textbook p. 101 Practice 6
  3. Textbook p. 103-4 Practice  7
  4. Textbook p. 106 Practice 8
  5. Textbook p. 107 Practice 9
  6. Textbook p. 108 Practice 10
  7. Free writing #2: write about a book, song, movie, painting, poem, performance, etc. that you respond strongly to.
  8. Short talk about the history of the academic paper.
  9. Edit your free writing #2 to make it more academic.

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