Tag Archives: week 10

AW2 week 10 December 9th, 2016

Homework

None.

Today’s class

  1. Discussion of student responses to the Dragon Zakura episode 6. (Download the document here: dragon-zakura-responses
    1. In an academic essay, you need to make arguments.
    2. Most of the examples in the document are personal opinions, not arguments.
      1. E.g., “I like American pop music so [the method demonstrated in the Dragon Zakura episode] is best for me.”
        1. Whether you approve of the method or not is irrelevant.
    3. Some sentences are “straw man arguments“. E.g.
      1. “The test was prepared by Sakuragi. It’s unfair because he and Kawaguchi knew what kinds of questions are included.”
        1. The fact that Sakuragi chose (not “prepared”) the test does not by itself make it unfair. It would only be unfair if he had told the students about the test (he did not), or if he had taught them a certain way especially for that test. He did not, nor did Kawaguchi. Kawaguchi made his method clear (using music and movement) well before the English contest was decided.
        2. “I disagree with learning English to pass entrance exams and not for communication.”
          1. the topic is the content of the video.   In this case, the students are trying to pass an entrance exam. In the video, Sakuragi explicity states that he is not teaching students to communicate but to pass the entrance exam.
          2. Therefore, the above opinion is a straw man and is rrelevant.
          1. “Enjoying studying is important, I think.”
            1. Irrelevant. The video makes no mention of making study enjoyable a goal or purpose. The purpose is simply to prepare students to pass the English entrance exam. Therefore, this comment is a red herring.
          2. “I agree that in order to acquire English, learners should use English, because the purpose of language is to communicate.”
            1. Irrelevant. A red herring. Kawaguchi in the video does not have the students use English in order to help them communicate. In fact, Sakuragi explicity states the purpose is not communication but entrance-exam preparation. The above sentence is the writer’s personal opinion, but it is not an argument and is irrelevant to the topic.
          3. “Kawaguchi says that, when you are on a date, you don’t use difficult words. I think this is true. To acquire language we need to present our feelings (thinking).”
            1. Red herring. The final sentence is the writer’s personal opinion, but it is not supported by anything in the video. The video does not show students learning to express their feelings, nor does it discuss the importance of expressing one’s feelings, or whether or not expressing feelings is necessary in order to acquire language.
    4. Some criticisms are irrelevant because they are factually incorrect. E.g.,
      1. “Learning English while exercising is good, but it is only effective if students already have a certain basic knowledge of English.”
        1. TPR is a well known method for teaching beginners in which instructors give and demonstrate commands and movements and learners copy the movement while hearing the commands. It is therefore incorrect to say that “learning English while exercising (i.e. while moving) is only effective if students already have a basic knowledge of English.”
    5. Another logical fallacy is “poisoning the well”, (“Presenting negative information about a person before he/she speaks so as to discredit the person’s argument. “). E.g.,
      1. “Sakuragi’s opinion is too simple. His powerful voice is persuasive but one-sided.”
        1. It is true that simply by speaking loudly and passionately a person may sound persuasive without actually making any logical arguments, and in fact there is an example of this in the video (by Kawaguchi). The writer making these accusations should rather use actual quotations from the video to illustrate the points he/she is trying to make.
  2. Write a response essay to the article “Majority Rule Equals Tyranny” by Walter Williams. Download the document here:  majority-rule-equals-tyranny

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Academic Writing I, week 10 : June 24th, 2016

Makeup announcement

Makeup class will be held on Saturday July 2nd, same room as usual, same time as usual.

Homework

  • Re-write your introduction paragraph for your problem-solution essay, by hand or typed. Bring it to class next week.

Today’s class

  1. Main idea worksheets (download them here: mainideak5chalkbox  Use only pages 5-16
  2. Individual conferencing about introductory paragraph for problem-solution essay.

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Academic Writing II, week 10: December 4th, 2015

Homework:

None. Take a break. Hang loose. Chill out.

Today’s class:

  1. Proofread your own and a classmate’s essay.
    1. Suitable title? Not too vague nor too long.
    2. Double-spaced?
    3. Your name, class, professor’s name, date
      1. in either top left or top right-hand corner
      2. and on the FIRST page ONLY
      3. Bibliography or works cited list
        1. You should all have at least one: the article you wrote your response to (either the “homework” one by Alfie Kohn, or the “violent video games” one by Amanda Shaffer (no, she’s not my sister!).
        2. Any Japanese books, articles, newspapers, magazines, websites, etc., that you use should all be in Roman letters (no Chinese letters should be anywhere in your essay)
        3. No URLs, just the title of the website.
  2. Textbook: Chapter 6: Timed Essays
    1. page 1134, answer the 4 questions (on looseleaf)
    2. page 135, read the sample essay
    3. page 140, read “A”, practice 5 (directly in the textbook)
    4. page 1141, practice 6 (directly in the textbook)
  3. Checked the answers to the sample academic reading #6 “David Cameron’s porn filter”,  Sample academic reading 6 .
    1. To understand “censorship creep” in the title, you need to understand “mission creep”. Click the link to read a Japanese translation.
    2. Then answer these questions:
      1. What does “censorship creep” mean?
        1. “Censorship creep”: the question asks you to define the meaning. Many students wrote, “It means increasing censorship”, but strictly speaking, that is the result of censorship creep, not the definition of the meaning. Answer the question.
      2. What was “always the intention”, according to the article?
        1. The purpose was always “to block far more than dirty pictures”.
      3. What non-pornographic sites were also filtered?
        1. Gay and lesbian sites and sex education sites.
      4. Does the author think that a “social or moral framework” is necessary for the Internet?
        1. No. There is no ‘social or moral framework’ in a library, so why should there be one on the Internet?
      5. What is the evidence, according to the article, that pornography harms young people?
        1. There is almost no evidence (“scant”).
      6. What does the author think the real purpose of the “porn filter” is?
        1. The author thinks, or suspects, that the real purpose of the “porn filter” is not to block pornography and protect the children but “a convenient way to block a lot of content the British government doesn’t want its citizens to see” without any proper public debate and discussion about it.
      7. What do you think “extremism” means, and why does the author put it in quotation marks (“..”)?
        1. Extremism means different things to different people. However, in the case of a national law, the meaning needs to be defined clearly and publicly, so that people everywhere know exactly what is permitted and what is not. The author puts it in quotation marks (“…”) because the author suspects that the government will use the word to persuade people to accept the new law, but then expand the meaning of the word to include “content that the British government doesn’t want its citizens to see”, such as information about file sharing and free music downloads, or simply sites critical of the government. Of course, such sites will not really be extremist according to a dictionary definition.
      8. What does the author mean by “in the name of protecting children”?
        1. The author means that protecting the children may well be used as an excuse to control adult behaviour in ever increasing and surprising ways.

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Academic Writing I, week 10: June 19th, 2015

Homework:

  • Start writing your problem-solution essay & collect evidence for your claims.

Makeup class for May 1st will be July 11. Time and place will be announced later.

Today’s class:

  1. Compare essay outlines with a classmate.
  2. Look at handout #2. (You can download handout #2 here: Is_Your_Doctor_Harming_You_edt  ). Answers:
    1. Why the details about the peer edited journal, etc?
      1. They show that this article was accepted by a professional peer-reviewed journal.
      2. The details allow anyone to check this journal to see if in fact the article was published in it or not.
    2. What are the numbers in parentheses for?
      1. They refer to the references or sources of information which the writer used to write this article.
    3. What is the meaning and purpose of “References” on p. 2?
      1. They give the precise details about the sources the writer used for evidence for his article. This information allows anyone to identify and find (and read) those sources to check if what the writer says is true.
  3. If the instructor says, “It is raining now”, you can check with yoru own eyes by looking out the window or going outside. However, if the instructor says (or writes) something like this, how do you know if it is true or not?
    1. Pryor was married to Patricia Price in 1960 and divorced the following year. .[citation needed]
    2. From this marriage, a son, Richard Pryor Jr. (1961), was born.[citation needed]
  4. What kind of evidence would you want to see for these claims?
  5. Here’s an example from Wikipedia:
    1. Bob Newhart has called Pryor “the seminal comedian of the last 50 years”.[21]
      1. .[21]“Bob Newhart”. PBS American Masters.

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Academic Writing I, week 10: June 20th, 2014

Homework:

  1. Read textbook pp 68-70
  2. Make a list of 10 ridiculous topics for a comparison-contrast essay
  3. Write an outline for
    1. comparison essay
    2. contrast essay
    3. comparison-contrast essay

Today’s class:

  1. Students read each other’s essays for a final proof-reading.
  2. Textbook chapter 3 p. 70 C, p. 71 D, p 72 Your Turn (list of possible topics)
  3. Handouts for your reference ご参考まで:
    1. Avoid vague language & Avoid repetition
    2. samples of “compare-contrast” writing + list of possible topics

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Academic Writing II – week 10, December 6th, 2013

Homework

  • Write your essay #2, either
    • a personal response to some text (a poem, speech, book – fiction or non-fiction – or song.
    • an academic response like the one in the textbook.
  • Print it ou and bring it to class next week
  • Finish re-writing your essay #1 (if you have not yet done so) and give or email it to me as soon as possible.

Whichever type you use, give the reader all the information he or she needs to find and read or listen to the work you are responding to.

Today’s class

Students started writing essay #2.


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Academic Writing I – week 10, June 21st, 2013

Homework:

Re-write your problem-solution essay.

Points to bear in mind.

  1. Avoid a moralizing tone.
  2. Don’t simply repeat what you have been told, what everybody knows, e.g. “Don’t put off to tomorrow what you can do today,” or “You should make sure you eat breakfast every day.”  Give the reader something fresh, original, interesting, funny.
  3. Give the reader a reason to read (some benefit for the reader). (Remember, the reader is not interested in you!)
  4. Your essay may have 5 (or more) paragraphs, but it should basically have three parts:
    1. Summarize the content of your essay: what are you going to talk about? Describe the problem and your solution (briefly).
    2. Explain the problem in more detail, if necessary, and tell us your solution or solutions.
    3. Summarize the content of your essay: what did you tell us about? Repeat the key points that you want the reader to remember.
  5. If possible, talk from your own experience. If you cannot, or don’t want to, you may need to do some research to find facts and figures. E.g. “Many young people cause accidents.” Is this true? If you don’t say how many, your reader may simply not believe you. If you say, “In 2012, there were 15,462 accidents in Japan involving people under the age of 25”, this is much more persuasive and convincing.
  6. Read your first draft again:  read it critically and unsympathetically. What objections might an unsympathetic reader make? Imagine you were reading your essay to this man below. Prepare your counter-arguments.

jeff-dunham-walter


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Academic Writing II – week 10, December 14th, 2012

Homework:

Read the article on Julie the jazz singer by Mike Rogers (you can read it online here and also see her music video), and also read the student-written responses to books and movies (PDF: click to download- Reactions_to_literature), then answer these questions in writing, and bring your answers to class next week (no need to email me):

  1. Which article did you enjoy reading the most? Why?
  2. Which parts and/or sentences of the article did you particularly like or remember?
  3. Which article did you not enjoy reading? Why?
  4. What makes a good response article/essay?
  5. (If you were absent today, do the writing exercises below and email them to me by Wednesday midnight.)

Today’s class:

  • I gave back the persuasive essays and spoke to each student about it.
  • We read the grey areas of Unit 5 in the textbook, about writing a response essay.
  • Free-writing (15 minutes) about any book, movie, concert, exhibition, painting, dance, event, etc. that you saw, read, heard or experienced and that you have strong feelings about. Do this writing at home if you were absent to day, and email it to me by Wednesday midnight.
  • Editing: read over your free-writing. Look at it critically. Check it for errors, etc.
  • Free-writing (10 minutes, private writing). Write about anything you want, but try and write some kind of truth.

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