Workers endure austere conditions in averting nuclear disaster – CNN.com

These guys are heroes. As of course are the ones not necessarily doing the actual work but racking their brains for seat-of-the-pants solutions to multiple problems (whether these problems could or should have been foreseen must wait until the crisis is over before being decided).  Until now, I haven’t linked to any CNN article, as there were none that were worth linking to. This is an exception, because there are so few articles on this subject (these guys are incommunicado). No doubt there’ll be a movie made about them.

They sleep anywhere they can find open space — in conference rooms, corridors, even stairwells. They have one blanket, no pillows and a leaded mat intended to keep radiation at bay.

They eat only two meals each day — a carefully rationed breakfast of 30 crackers and vegetable juice and for dinner, a ready-to-eat meal or something out of a can.They clean themselves with wet wipes, since the supply of fresh water is short.

These are the grueling living conditions for the workers inside Japan’s crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. They’ve been hailed as heroes risking their lives by braving high levels of radiation as they work to avert a nuclear meltdown.

But until now, the outside world has known little about the workers’ routine.

via Workers endure austere conditions in averting nuclear disaster – CNN.com.


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