James Garner – R.I.P.

James Garner, April 7, 1928 – July 19, 2014.

Here’s an obituary in Britain’s The Daily Mirror. And here he is in the last movie he acted in: not perhaps a great movie, but an interesting story; the lead is appropriately annoying and the little girl is delightful. Interesting dialogue, too.

The Ultimate Gift (Full Movie)


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The Moment Now

Prem Rawat teaches us that people live in two minutes: the minute that just happened and the minute that’s on its way. The past and the future. He teaches us to live in the third minute, which is the here and the now; how to just appreciate being alive.

Find out more at www.wopg.org


I recommend the following guides: Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Peace is … – Don’t define it. Feel it.


I recommend the following guides: Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Transfer of Reactor 4′s SFP content 75% complete

R4_FuelTransfer_1188e

Breakdown of transferred assemblies by kind

  • Spent fuel
    • 1166 assemblies/1,331 assemblies
  • Unirradiated
    • New fuel22 assemblies/ 202 assemblies
  • Number of times of cask transportation: 54 timesas of June.30,2014

*The fuel removal work is stopped from July 1 to earlySeptember of 2014 due to annual ceiling crane checkup

via TEPCO : Decommissioning Plan of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power.


I recommend the following guides: Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

“We just got wired into the system”

You may soon get a call from your doctor if you’ve let your gym membership lapse, made a habit of picking up candy bars at the check-out counter or begin shopping at plus-sized stores.

That’s because some hospitals are starting to use detailed consumer data to create profiles on current and potential patients to identify those most likely to get sick, so the hospitals can intervene before they do.

Blogger, investor and entrepreneur Karl Denninger warned about this back in the ’90s.

Then there was this well known video of a guy trying to order a pizza in the future. Congratulations! The future just became the present:

Ordering Pizza in the Future


I recommend the following guides: Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

TEPCO : Decommissioning Plan of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power

R4_FuelTransfer_1078e

Breakdown of transferred assemblies by kind

  • Spent fuel                                 1100 assemblies/1,331 assemblies
  • Unirradiated New fuel         22 assemblies/ 202 assemblies
  • Number of times of cask transportation: 51 times  as of June 23, 2014

via TEPCO : Decommissioning Plan of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power.


I recommend the following guides: Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

What Henry Hazlitt Can Teach Us About Inflation in 2014 – James Grant – Mises Daily

Henry Hazlitt was an American journalist who lived through the Great Depression and went on to write about economic (and other) matters in  The American Mercury, The New York Times and Newsweek. The Henry Hazlitt Memorial Lecture is a lecture held annually at the Mises Institute. This year, the lecture was given by financial journalist Jim Grant.

Jim Grant wrote an article for the Mises Institute based on his lecture but including some things he did not mention. One of them was this definition of deflation:

“Deflation,” too, is a perennially misunderstood term. It is not — as one so often hears it defined — a simple decline in aggregate prices. Let’s try a mind experiment. Suppose you lived in a time of material and technological wonder: of digital technology that sets robots to work, makes universally accessible the canon of human knowledge and, to be sure, of human error and coordinates and arbitrages the world’s far-flung labor markets. As it costs less to make things, so it should cost less to buy them.

Would you call this happy state of affairs “deflation” — or might you call it “progress”? Most Americans seem to not to mind it, whatever the Federal Reserve chooses to call it. They spend half their weekends looking for it.

With this in mind, let’s hear from Hazlitt himself, master of economic clarity. Here he is in June 1946 — in the New York Times, no less — taking the government to task for its misplaced worry about a return to the 1930s.“A Washington correspondent of the Wall Street Journal reports that the government economic experts are now convinced the ‘deflation’ and not inflation will be the big problem six months to a year from now,” Hazlitt began. “Planners of federal financial policy make no secret of their belief that the danger of post-war inflation was passed in late spring, and that from now on the greater danger lies in too-rapid deflation. Such a belief on the part of the government planners in Washington would not be surprising, the whole economic philosophy they have adopted leads them to believe that ‘the real danger is deflation,’ whatever the evidence may be on the other side.”

In 1946, as now, the government held up the threat of deflation to justify a policy of ultra-low low interest rates and easy money. Now ladies, and gentlemen, I have devoted thirty-one years of my life to writing about interest rates, and I have to tell you that I can’t see them anymore. They’re tiny. And so they were in 1946. Then, as now, the Fed had been conscripted into the government’s financial service. Just as it does today, the central bank pushed money-market interest rates virtually to zero and longer-dated Treasury securities to less than 3 percent. Just as it does today, the Fed had its thumb on the scales of finance.

via What Henry Hazlitt Can Teach Us About Inflation in 2014 – James Grant – Mises Daily.


I recommend the following guides: Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Another Setback for Abenomics

That nice Mr. Abe has been working so hard to make his Abenomics work that it seems a shame that not everyone supports it. In fact, some people, like this writer below, can’t see the point of a 2% inflation target at all. Why ever not? He obviously hasn’t read Milton Friedman and is therefore obviously an ignoramus. Anyway, here’s the quote:

‘Inflation’, i.e., consumer prices, appear to be the only thing that is in a fairly strong uptrend by Japanese standards anyway. We can therefore remain fairly certain that real incomes continue to decline. Considering the aging population with ever more people relying on some sort of fixed income, the BoJ’s inflationary policy makes even less sense in Japan than elsewhere. For unknown reasons rising prices are hailed as a ‘success’. We know of approximately 127 million Japanese consumers who would disagree.

In fact, it feels totally bizarre to read about this every time. Consider the formulation in the excerpt from Reuters below: “Nationwide consumer prices showed that inflation picked up in April, excluding the April 1 sales tax hike – a welcome sign in the Bank of Japan’s battle to bring inflation to 2 percent.”

A central bank ‘battling’ to increase inflation? It is a ‘welcome sign’ when consumer prices are rising? All we can say to this is that it proves that world has gone mad and that there is nothing more absurd than the economic theories on which modern central banking is based.

via Another Setback for Abenomics |.


I recommend the following guides: Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Music for Monday (or more babes playing crazy piano)

Came home today with  the last movement of Prokofieff’s Piano Sonata No. 7 playing in my head, for some reason. Haven’t heard it in years. The first time I heard it was I think Martha Argerich playing it. I heard it once. I told my piano teacher “I want to play that!” She freaked out. I bought the music and practised on my own anyway. Of course, I couldn’t play it, but it is just such a cool piece, especially the final (3rd) movement, which only lasts a few minutes, a few muscle-exhausting, head-banging, emotionally-draining minutes.

It being several decades since I heard this piece (why the hell it should be in my head, then?), I couldn’t remember its name, only that it was by Prokofieff. After floundering around unsuccessfuly on the internets thingies, I finally remembered Argerich had played it. Cue Youtube. It’s a lousy recording, taken by someone in the audience, and the sound is less than ideal and there’s the back of people’s heads all over the place. But. There’s a backstory. In 1990, Argerich was diagnosed with malignant melanoma. Treatment was successful and it went into remission. Only to flare up again in 1995. This time it had metastasized to her lungs and lymph nodes, usually a death sentence. But the John Wayne Cancer Institute did surgery on her lung and gave her an experimental vaccine. It worked! In gratitude, Argerich did this benefit concert at the Carnegie Hall.

Argerich is a badass. She doesn’t move around much in this performance, but her 3rd movement is fast (though no faster than her previous recordings of this piece), and when she’s finished, no messing around, she just stands straight up! “That’s it, folks! Time to go home!” (If you want to jump to the 3rd movement – my favourite part – it starts at 13:23). (One of her daughters – she has 3 by 3 different fathers – made a movie about her mother which sounds fascinating: read a review of it here.)

Argerich, Martha Prokofiev Sonata No 7, Live in Carnegie Hall

YouTube kindly suggests similar videos you might be interested in, and high on the list was the same piece of music played by another dame, Russian (or to be precise Georgian; they might not like being lumped with the Russians, like the Scots hate being called English, quite understandable). Completely unpronounceable name, but great playing: much clearer than Argerich’s, imho, and perhaps the 3rd movement taken a little faster. I like the way she grabs the back of the seat after finishing the piece, as if the piano (or the piece) had thrown her off after a titanic struggle): here’s S. Prokofiev Piano Sonata no.7 Opus 83 (B) By Khatia Buniatishvili

S. Prokofiev Piano Sonata no.7 Opus 83 (B) By Khatia Buniatishvili

Continue Reading »


I recommend the following guides: Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Music for Sunday

My wife and I are both fans of jazz pianist Keith Jarrett and many years ago went to see him play in Osaka. He was back in Osaka a few days ago, but cut his performance short because he was distracted by the poor manners of the audience who made so much noise coughing and whatnot that he just stopped playing and walked out. This is something of a trademark for Jarrett. Back in the days when he did long solo improvisations, he would suddenly stop and walk out when the inspiration left him, i.e. when he’d had enough, as he did in the Osaka concert I went to see.

A google search for this recent walkout got no results, but there are plenty of irate Japanese comments from locals. Apparently, he cut short not only his May 6 Osaka concert, but also his May 9 Tokyo concert. I hope Sir Paul McCartney doesn’t do the same at the Budokan!

My wife had some fantastic jazz piano playing while she was surfing  the internet. When I asked her who was playing, she told me Hiromi Uehara. If you were one of those who spent good money to see Keith Jarrett and were disappointed, or if you weren’t but just love jazz piano, or simply enjoy watching musicians having a blast, here’s Hiromi playing one of her own compositions, the fast and furious “The Tom and Jerry Show”.

Hiromi Uehara – The Tom and Jerry Show

 

 


I recommend the following guides: Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”