“We are so attracted to distraction”

The Journey of Life – Prem Rawat (English)


I recommend the following guides: Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Dropbox Cuts Pricing And Adds Great Sharing Features

I’ve been a Dropbox user for several years now. I rely on it more and more, and use USB thumb-drives less and less.

Dropbox has a referral system which gives you 500MB for each referral who joins and installs Dropbox, up to a max of 16GB (if you join after clicking the link above, I’ll get yet more space!). I’ve accrued an extra 3GB this way, and I use just 2.5 GB of my 5.75 GB, so I use the free version, as the number and size of my files don’t justify the Pro version.

But I was still glad to read in a recent blog post by paperless master Brooks Duncan that Dropbox have dropped (geddit?) their prices to compete with Google Drive and others.

I was particularly interested in some of the new features that have been added. Here’s Brooks:

New Sharing Features

Dropbox outlines their new features in their blog post, but the key changes are:

  • Password protection: You can now assign a password for a shared link. This is great! You’ve always been able to generate a link to a file or folder, but theoretically anyone who came across that link however unlikely that may be would be able to see your information. Now you can password protect that link. More on that here.
  • Expire shared links: Another great feature when it comes to going paperless. Often when we share a link to a file, the recipient only needs access for a short period. You’ve always been able to review and remove those shared files, but now you can set the link to expire automatically. Here is how it works.

Filepost offers the same service and there’s a Filepost Japan, too. I was toying with the idea of using Filepost when I read Brooks’ article. Filepost isn’t really a storage service like Dropbox, tho; it’s just for sharing files on a short-term basis. Back to Brooks:

  • Folder Premissions: One of the problems with sharing a file with someone via a file syncing service like Dropbox is that if the person deletes or modifies the file, it is deleted or modified for you too. You mark a recipient as read only so they can see a folder but can’t mess it up. More on that here.

via Dropbox Cuts Pricing And Adds Great Sharing Features.

I recommend DocumentSnap Solutions’ Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap’s free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.


I recommend the following guides: Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

James Garner – R.I.P.

James Garner, April 7, 1928 – July 19, 2014.

Here’s an obituary in Britain’s The Daily Mirror. And here he is in the last movie he acted in: not perhaps a great movie, but an interesting story; the lead is appropriately annoying and the little girl is delightful. Interesting dialogue, too.

The Ultimate Gift (Full Movie)


I recommend the following guides: Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

The Moment Now

Prem Rawat teaches us that people live in two minutes: the minute that just happened and the minute that’s on its way. The past and the future. He teaches us to live in the third minute, which is the here and the now; how to just appreciate being alive.

Find out more at www.wopg.org


I recommend the following guides: Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Transfer of Reactor 4′s SFP content 75% complete

R4_FuelTransfer_1188e

Breakdown of transferred assemblies by kind

  • Spent fuel
    • 1166 assemblies/1,331 assemblies
  • Unirradiated
    • New fuel22 assemblies/ 202 assemblies
  • Number of times of cask transportation: 54 timesas of June.30,2014

*The fuel removal work is stopped from July 1 to earlySeptember of 2014 due to annual ceiling crane checkup

via TEPCO : Decommissioning Plan of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power.


I recommend the following guides: Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Peace is … – Don’t define it. Feel it.


I recommend the following guides: Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

“We just got wired into the system”

You may soon get a call from your doctor if you’ve let your gym membership lapse, made a habit of picking up candy bars at the check-out counter or begin shopping at plus-sized stores.

That’s because some hospitals are starting to use detailed consumer data to create profiles on current and potential patients to identify those most likely to get sick, so the hospitals can intervene before they do.

Blogger, investor and entrepreneur Karl Denninger warned about this back in the ’90s.

Then there was this well known video of a guy trying to order a pizza in the future. Congratulations! The future just became the present:

Ordering Pizza in the Future


I recommend the following guides: Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

TEPCO : Decommissioning Plan of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power

R4_FuelTransfer_1078e

Breakdown of transferred assemblies by kind

  • Spent fuel                                 1100 assemblies/1,331 assemblies
  • Unirradiated New fuel         22 assemblies/ 202 assemblies
  • Number of times of cask transportation: 51 times  as of June 23, 2014

via TEPCO : Decommissioning Plan of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power.


I recommend the following guides: Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

What Henry Hazlitt Can Teach Us About Inflation in 2014 – James Grant – Mises Daily

Henry Hazlitt was an American journalist who lived through the Great Depression and went on to write about economic (and other) matters in  The American Mercury, The New York Times and Newsweek. The Henry Hazlitt Memorial Lecture is a lecture held annually at the Mises Institute. This year, the lecture was given by financial journalist Jim Grant.

Jim Grant wrote an article for the Mises Institute based on his lecture but including some things he did not mention. One of them was this definition of deflation:

“Deflation,” too, is a perennially misunderstood term. It is not — as one so often hears it defined — a simple decline in aggregate prices. Let’s try a mind experiment. Suppose you lived in a time of material and technological wonder: of digital technology that sets robots to work, makes universally accessible the canon of human knowledge and, to be sure, of human error and coordinates and arbitrages the world’s far-flung labor markets. As it costs less to make things, so it should cost less to buy them.

Would you call this happy state of affairs “deflation” — or might you call it “progress”? Most Americans seem to not to mind it, whatever the Federal Reserve chooses to call it. They spend half their weekends looking for it.

With this in mind, let’s hear from Hazlitt himself, master of economic clarity. Here he is in June 1946 — in the New York Times, no less — taking the government to task for its misplaced worry about a return to the 1930s.“A Washington correspondent of the Wall Street Journal reports that the government economic experts are now convinced the ‘deflation’ and not inflation will be the big problem six months to a year from now,” Hazlitt began. “Planners of federal financial policy make no secret of their belief that the danger of post-war inflation was passed in late spring, and that from now on the greater danger lies in too-rapid deflation. Such a belief on the part of the government planners in Washington would not be surprising, the whole economic philosophy they have adopted leads them to believe that ‘the real danger is deflation,’ whatever the evidence may be on the other side.”

In 1946, as now, the government held up the threat of deflation to justify a policy of ultra-low low interest rates and easy money. Now ladies, and gentlemen, I have devoted thirty-one years of my life to writing about interest rates, and I have to tell you that I can’t see them anymore. They’re tiny. And so they were in 1946. Then, as now, the Fed had been conscripted into the government’s financial service. Just as it does today, the central bank pushed money-market interest rates virtually to zero and longer-dated Treasury securities to less than 3 percent. Just as it does today, the Fed had its thumb on the scales of finance.

via What Henry Hazlitt Can Teach Us About Inflation in 2014 – James Grant – Mises Daily.


I recommend the following guides: Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Another Setback for Abenomics

That nice Mr. Abe has been working so hard to make his Abenomics work that it seems a shame that not everyone supports it. In fact, some people, like this writer below, can’t see the point of a 2% inflation target at all. Why ever not? He obviously hasn’t read Milton Friedman and is therefore obviously an ignoramus. Anyway, here’s the quote:

‘Inflation’, i.e., consumer prices, appear to be the only thing that is in a fairly strong uptrend by Japanese standards anyway. We can therefore remain fairly certain that real incomes continue to decline. Considering the aging population with ever more people relying on some sort of fixed income, the BoJ’s inflationary policy makes even less sense in Japan than elsewhere. For unknown reasons rising prices are hailed as a ‘success’. We know of approximately 127 million Japanese consumers who would disagree.

In fact, it feels totally bizarre to read about this every time. Consider the formulation in the excerpt from Reuters below: “Nationwide consumer prices showed that inflation picked up in April, excluding the April 1 sales tax hike – a welcome sign in the Bank of Japan’s battle to bring inflation to 2 percent.”

A central bank ‘battling’ to increase inflation? It is a ‘welcome sign’ when consumer prices are rising? All we can say to this is that it proves that world has gone mad and that there is nothing more absurd than the economic theories on which modern central banking is based.

via Another Setback for Abenomics |.


I recommend the following guides: Brett Kelly's "Evernote Essentials", Dan Gold's $5 guides to Getting Everything Done with Evernote and Springpad, and DocumentSnap Solutions' Paperless Document Organization Guides. Be sure to try DocumentSnap's free email course on going paperless first before buying his products. Sign up for it on his homepage.
Disclosure of Material Connection: My recommendations above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Your cost will be the same as if you order directly. I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”